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Letters home to mom

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  • RSS Cat Cartoon w/o the Cartoon

    • Coda
      Posting these cat-cartoons-without-the-cartoon was a long journey that I don’t know if I’ll repeat soon again. A daily blog is tough … even when you have your material handed to you! But, I couldn’t have done it without the artwork … Continue reading →
    • December 31, 2011
      Father Time is riding out his last few minutes of being the temporal keeper for 2011; he sits in an easy chair with a calendar showing “Dec 31” behind him and a grandfather clock pointing to the time of 11:53. … Continue reading →
    • December 30, 2011
      A happy young lady shares a table at a tony restaurant with her cat; they both wear festive, cone-shaped party hats. The woman gaily says to the tuxedoed server, “One martini and one glass of milk.” The cat does not … Continue reading →

Now that was a heavy rock

Posted by joeabbott on May 21, 2017

I don’t have before pictures, I don’t have “during” pictures … I just have this:

Image

And that, my friends, is a picture of a very old rosemary plant, surrounded by rocks and chickens. And the rock on the far right … well, that was one heavy beast.

Suzanne’s gardens are a thing of wonder: vibrant greens, amazing textures, and lots and lots of plants. But she’s learned not to be sentimental: if something is working, great; if something isn’t, yank it! Her treatment is far more nuanced than that, but she has developed an attitude that allows plants to hit the compost bin “when it’s time”. And for the rosemary in the picture above, it was time. But I wasn’t ready to let it go.

When we put in our backyard, this was one of the first plants, so I’m happy to see it stay. As I agreed with her that it wasn’t fit for the spot it was in, we moved it to the chicken side of our property. But we know the chickens will revel in soft, turned soil. They love it. Want to keep a bunch of hens happy for a while, just shovel a spade of earth over in your yard and leave them to it … before you know, they’ll have excavated something truly impressive and continue to dig. And so we’ve come up with the “surround it with rocks” strategy. It works in our current yard (looks-wise) and keeps them from uprooting plants, but with our loose soil you really need some big rocks to anchor things.

So, as we readied to move the rosemary, we looked around for a good-size rock. All the stones on our side have been spoken for but the plot next door that has been recently turned and flattened (for development of a home) had a number of large stones just laying about. I eyed one of them and set about to bring it over. It was a challenging project.

The stone had good angles but was heavy as all get out. Picking it up was out of the question and even rolling it proved a greater challenge than I could easily manage. The soft soil didn’t help as any drop tended to lodge it deep into the earth and require a bit of digging to clear. Ultimately the stone sunk into a tractor tread divot and I was unable to push it out. I ran to the garage and rigged up a piece of plywood that I could tether the rock onto using nylon webbing … and then I hauled the plywood, sled-like, across the lot. The plywood kept the rock from lodging into the ground and diffused the load. It was a good plan and worked … until I got it into our yard.

In our yard, the rock had to be dragged up the hill and up steps … which would have been impossible for me to do alone. Suzanne helped by pushing while I pulled, but it was a hard bit of work. We were happy to finally get it into place: a massive, keystone rock that would look great. That is, right up until we buried it well enough to support the plant on the hillside. Enough of it was sunk into the ground that, what remains above looks like a simple rock. For comparison, the largish rock on the left was small enough that I not only got it from the same lot, but I was able to carry it without stopping.

But, this is the sort of thing we do over here: make our lives a bit more challenging by feeling sympathy for plants and seemingly finding the hardest way to accomplish something like transplanting an herb. Good thing it makes us happy. And we are happy … well, once we’re rested, that is! Thanks for coming by.

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